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L. Remini: accuses Scientology figure of statutory rape (general)

by AC @, Wednesday, November 30, 2016, 20:52
edited by AC, Wednesday, November 30, 2016, 21:44

In my opinion: Islam, Scientology, Mormonism, Christian Science, and Jehovah witnesses have similar beginnings. Christian's also need to stay clear of FreeMasonry

All (except the occult leaning FreeMasonry) are based on the rantings and ravings of a single individual who gained substantial incomes from inventing those Religions.!

WAKE UP! Scientology was 'invented' by a man (L. Ron Hubbard) who admitted that it makes much more sense & lucrative to invent a Religion than to keep publishing 10 cent novels as he had been doing. Scientology is a BUSINESS. Much as the other cult known as 'Jehovah Witness's' are. IF JESUS is not at the CENTER as with both of these - then we have CULTS. So BEWARE! And be very scared for your ultimate Salvation. Scientology teaches that Jesus Christ did not exist (RE: Hubbard's CL VIII tape). Hubbard declared in the late 1940s: “Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion.” /s/ Steve K

'Leah Remini: Scientology' accuses church figure of statutory rape, abuse
Erin Jensen, USA TODAY 3:12 p.m. EST November 30, 2016

Though she's known for bringing laughs with comedic performances in The King of Queens and Old School, Leah Remini's latest project deals with very serious subject matter.

In a new A&E docu-series which she executive produced, Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath, Remini interviews former members of the Church of Scientology about their experiences as followers and their lives after leaving the religion.

Remini faced a backlash since publicly parting ways with the organization in 2013, and she hopes to send a message to the church with her series. "You’re not gonna continue to lie to people and abuse people and take their money and their lives," she says in the show. "If I can stop one, then I’m gonna do it.”

Here are seven major allegations from Tuesday's premiere episode.

1. Statutory rape went unreported to the police

Amy Scobee, who said she was in charge of Celebrity Centres, didn’t go to high school and became a member at 14. She alleged that she was taken advantage of by her boss, who was 35 at the time.

“He was married,” she said, “and he had me stay back when everybody else left, and basically we had sex. This was statutory rape, and I was too afraid to tell anyone about it.”

Scobee said her boss told his wife about the incident and the couple told the Church, but the Church did not inform Scobee's parents or police. Scobee also said that, because of the practices of the religion, she absorbed the blame.

“And they indoctrinated in me that if anything serious goes on, it’s handled internally,” she shared. “It happened to me, so therefore I must’ve done something that caused it.”

In a statement to USA TODAY, the Church says it informed A&E prior to broadcast that the claim is false.


2. Scientologists take judicial matters into their own hands

In response to Scobee’s confession, Mike Rinder, who says he was the international spokesman for Scientology for 20 years, alleged that the church breeds distrust of the judicial system.

“You’re also indoctrinated in Scientology to believe that the justice system is corrupt,” he said, “that it doesn’t do anything to ever resolve the problem. That Scientology is where the answers lie, to even a child molester.”

3. Leader David Miscavige is physically abusive

Scobee described the Church's leader as “a very angry man." She said, "If you said something that didn’t please him he would go off on you. If you were a man he would likely hit you, punch you, knock you down, choke you.”

4. Letters are written to families so members won’t be reported missing

Scobee said Scientologists are taught that “the church is first, and family is a distraction.” She said congregants write to family members so they won't be reported as missing.

“They're called ‘good roads fair weather’ letters,” she said, “so that they don’t file missing persons reports on you or go to the media because they haven’t heard from their children, or something like that.”

FINISH READING this at: USAtoday

RELATED

LEARN ABOUT - so you can avoid, the 'Godless' CULT of SCIENTOLOGY here: http://prorege-forum.com/scientology.htm

Tags:
scientology. L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology a Cult

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